In the mid-to-late 1980s, the Jefferson County Historical Commission embarked on an ambitious Place Names Project to research, document, and catalog known geographic place names in Jefferson County, both contemporary and historic. A large committee was established, and its members scoured USGS quadrangles, history books, and other sources to write descriptions of areas with which they were familiar. The database of almost 2,500 entries was first placed on the county’s website in the 1990s. In 2020 it was transferred to Golden History Museum & Park, City of Golden.

Still a work in progress, you can peruse the descriptions here. We are continually refining the contents. Let us know if you see any errors.

Daffodil Post Office

It was established April 11, 1896, at Trumball, discontinued February 19, 1908, and moved to Deckers. Origin of name unknown.


Dakota Hogback

On the eastern slope of the hogback in the sandstone of the South Platte formation, fossilized leaves, marine fish scales, dinosaur tracks, and ripple marks are visible. On the western slope, dinosaur bones occur in the siltstone and sandstone members of the Morrison formation. Presently owned and protected by the conservancy “Friends of Dinosaur Ridge.”


Daniel’s Park

This park has athletic fields, playground, outdoor barbecue, horseshoe, volleyball and lighted tennis courts.



Danny Kendrick Park

This 3.60 acre park was the result of the 1974 bond election and was developed the following year. The Park was named for a small boy, Danny Kendrick, who was hit by a car and killed on Ward Road. The park’s development would establish it as an integral part of Ralston Creek greenbelt system. East and west of Ward Road were playgrounds, picnic areas and bike trails.


Dargin Mine

D.G. Dargin claim at the summit of the mountain. The mine is down to ten feet. December 29, 1883, Koch, Dargin, and Bellan make a mineral strike near the head of Dead Man’s Gulch. There is a prominent outcropping of a crevice containing copper and silver in the form of oxides and sulphurites.
January 26, 1884, at the Dargin Mine the rock is colored with malachite and azurite, green and blue, with copper pyrite available.
October 4, 1884, Dargin has located a zinc mine in Chimney Gulch. March,4,1883, Dargin name the Chimney Gulch lode “The Campion.” The shaft is 100 feet down and the ore rich in iron carbonate.
November 14,1888, D.G. Dargin is listed as Golden City Marshal.



Davis & Brown Ditch

Located in Water District #7, under Priority date, 5-11-1878, this ditch originates from the north bank of Leyden Creek. Claimants in 1884 were Mary A. Davis and Charles M. Brown. Mary A. Davis, daughter of pioneer Harpin Davis, was a property owner in Section 4, Township 3 South, Range 69 West, east of present-day Oak Street.


Davis & Rand Ditch

Located in Water District #7, under Priority #12 (5-26-1865). This ditch diverts water out of the north bank of Ralston Creek. Claimants in 1884 were area farmers Charles Rand, Charles M. Brown & Harpin Davis. The ditch was abandoned January 30, 1981.


Davis Brothers Florists, Inc.

A 1930s Davis Brothers Florists’ calendar proudly displays and aerial photograph of the company’s office, warehouse, and greenhouses with a caption boasting, “One hundred sixty-seven thousand square feet of glass devoted exclusively to the growing of carnations of superior quality. Grown a mile nearer the sun with keeping qualities miles ahead.” Davis Brothers also had 30 consigned growers whose production they handled. Greenhouses were located throughout the Wheat Ridge area, some owned by former Davis employees, such as Homer Hill at 7901 W. 32nd Avenue, who was awarded numerous national prizes as a premier carnation grower. At first heat was provided by coal stoked furnaces and later natural gas. The flowers were shipped by rail and trucks all over the nation, as well as abroad. Air freight replaced rail and truck. At one time flowers were the largest airlift commodity out of Denver’s Stapleton Airport. Davis Brothers Florists was dissolved in 1979.


Davis Business Block

Graves Blacksmith Shop, built in late 1860s, was the first building at this site. It was razed to service a new mode of transportation, “the iron horse.” A. L. Davis completed the first portion of his building in April, 1916. It was occupied by Davis Garage, a show room for Dodge and Chevrolet automobiles on the ground floor, and apartments on the second story. A second addition was built in 1921 and a third addition, minus a second floor, was constructed in 1927. The building exists in 1994 and is named for this enterprising entrepreneur, A.L. Davis.



Davis Lane Park

The City of Arvada acquired the land from John F. Fuller & Co. and leased it to North Jeffco Recreation and Park District for 99 years in 1967, and deeded it to North Jeffco, April 12, 1968. This action was signed by Mayor Richard Bartlett. The park was developed in 1975 as a result of the 1974 City of Arvada Bond Election. Additional land was provided by the developer and a shelter house was constructed. The park was named because it was close to an early street, Davis Lane, the street on which pioneer Harpin Davis lived. The current name of Davis Lane is now Oak Street.



Davy Reservoir

Claimant in 1936 was Mabel S. Davy. Original construction in 1905 was by Laura Randall. Located in Water District #7, this reservoir is filled with water diverted from Clear Creek via Farmers High Line Canal through Hyatt Lake and South Branch Lateral. Appears on State Engineer’s “Water Rights Report.”


Deacon’s Bench

Architect John Ross designed this c.1880 1-1/2 story, Victorian, frame, high gabled, house with shiplap siding. It has a left side front entrance and small rectangle windows. John Ross had a lumber business in Evergreen and sold lumber all the way down Bear Creek to Denver. He had lumber mills along Bear Creek. It was his employees and business associates that used this guest house. In 1921, it was purchased by the Pillar of Fire Church and used intermittently as a rental residence and to house the church’s pre-school nursery. Since the late 1980s it has been a tea room with a quaint outside garden and a antique shop on the attic, “Deacon’s Attic Antique Shop.” In front was “Deacon’s Bench,” a passenger pick-up for the stage.



Dean’s Grocery Store

Dean’s Grocery Store built ca. 1890 by John Ross. There was a dance hall upstairs, and on Sunday it was the Episcopal Sunday School taught by Mrs. Mary Chattie Ross, John’s wife. From 1924 to 1946 it was Peinze’s Grocery Store.


Deane Elementary School

Built in 1955. Originally named Smith Alameda Elementary and for the geographical area. In 1983 it was named to honor Mary and Ilene Deane, sisters who worked 25 years for the school district. They both began teaching in 1957 and retired in 1982.


Dedisse Park

A Denver Mountain Park of 420 acres acquired by condemnation in 1919 for $25,000 from heirs of French pioneers Jerome and Mary de Disse. The Evergreen Dam was built on the property in 1926-1927. The Park features fireplaces, picnic areas, shelter house, golf course, skating in winter, fishing , volleyball, club and warming house. Early photos show hay meadows and ranch buildings in the area now covered by Evergreen Lake. The spelling of the name varies. The park was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (5JF645) on November 15, 1990.


Deer Creek

This creek created Deer Creek Canyon and flows into the Platte River.




Deer Creek Junior High School

Located two miles south of Southwest Plaza and one-half mile west on West Columbine Drive, this school is part of the Jefferson County R1 School District. It was built in 1980 with a capacity of 842. It was named for Deer Creek which runs through the area.



Deer Creek School

The one room school house on the bank of Deer Creek was built in 1883 and was closed in 1950. The first teacher was Mrs. McWilliams, followed by Mrs. Bill Allen. The pupils who rode to school on horseback were children of local farmers and workers at Denver’s Waterworks at Waterton and the Great Western Sugar Company beet dump on the Platte River. There were 15 to 20 pupils in eight grades. The school house was moved a short distance to the west from its original location and serves as the visitors’ center for the Chatfield Arboretum of the Denver Botanic Gardens.



Deer Creek Wagon Road

from the Cultural Contexts report, 2004:

Deer Creek Wagon Road (1867)
This road was built along Deer Creek. The lower four-mile-segment from the hogback was constructed by the Deer Creek Wagon Road & Lumbering Company in 1867. The upper portion followed Fall River to reach Pleasant Park and subsequently Bradford Junction (Conifer). The steep, treacherous nature of the Fall Road discouraged travel, and it was replaced in 1920 by the High Grade Road that climbed the steep southern slope of Sampson Mountain. Local residents built the lower half of the High Grade Road with hand tools, and the county agreed to construct the upper portion.


Deer Gulch

It was probably named for the creek which formed the gulch.



Deer Valley

Application for Post Office by George Parmelee in 1870. Route from Denver to Buckskin Joe Postmaster from Fairplay, CO issued the application.


Deermont

South Fork Deer Creek runs through Deermont. Had a number of residences about 4 miles NW of Waterton on 1980 survey map.


Del Piccolo Reservoir

Located in Water District #7, the appropriation date January 1, 1965, is for 5.9 acre feet filled by seepage. Probably named for land owner.






Denbow, Grover House

Built ca. 1875. This house was also used as a railroad crew house; later it was a rental. Grover Denbow rented it when he came to Morrison with his family in 1912. Denbow was a trapper, among other jobs. It was also called Orchard Place.



Dennison Fundamental Alternative

Built in 1958. Re-named Olive Dennison who was the first principal of the school. Originally known as the West Lakewood Elementary.


Denver & Crown Hill Railway

A need for public transportation led Crown Hill to secure a charter for this trolley in November, 1910. This electric line ran from 29th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard west to Wadsworth Boulevard, plus a short segment of track south on Wadsworth for the car to enter and then proceed east, back to Sheridan. This was a “jitney” double ended car so it had no need for “turn around.” It normally operated only until early evening. Funeral trains ran straight through (no stops) with extra cars used if needed. The last run was on Memorial Day, May 30, 1928. It was replaced by a small bus.

The electric power, night time storage and maintenance was supplied by Denver Tramway Company.


Denver & Crown Hill Trolley

When Crown Hill Cemetery wanted trolley service they built their own electric line from the end of the Tramway Line at West 29th Ave. and Sheridan Blvd. to West 29th Ave. and Wadsworth Blvd., a distance of a 1.5 miles. This line was chartered in November, 1910 and continued to operate until May 30, 1928 when a small bus replaced it. Maintenance and electric power were supplied by the Denver Tramway. It was a “jitney” run with one car which was a double ended car and avoided a need for a turnaround. Funeral trains operated straight through to Crown Hill Cemetery as did a few cars providing extra service. The car was stored in the north division barn. It normally operated until early evening.


Denver & Intermountain Electric Railway

The electric railway was in operation in 1903 to the Leyden coal mines. In 1913, this line was absorbed by the Denver City Tramway company. By 1950, all electrical tramway systems were abandoned and the tracks removed. Later, Remington Arms Plant Spur, from a point near Morningside Station to the Federal Center, was constructed at federal government expense by the trackage rights over the Denver and the Intermountain Railway system. It was later taken over by the United States government in 1941.


Denver & Northwestern Railroad

This railway was incorporated in 1901, for the purpose of hauling coal from the Leyden Mines to the Denver City Tramway Company’s new power generation plant. Track gauge was 42″ matching that of the Denver Tramway Company. Overhead conductors were installed for electrical operation, and power-cars made from standard gondolas were equipped with motor trucks and controls. A standard third gauge was added between Arvada and Leyden to accommodate Colorado and Southern cars. A branch to Golden, bringing the total track at Lakeside, was completed in 1904. In 1913, the Denver and Northwestern Railway and the Denver and Intermountain Electric Railway were absorbed by the Denver City Tramway Company. The routes from Sheridan Boulevard to Clear Creek Junction were: car 82 to Leyden; car 84 to Golden; and car 83 to Arvada. The Denver City Tramway Company was discontinued in1950.


Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad

One of Colorado’s outstanding railroads, the Denver and Rio Grande Western, absorbed the Denver and Salt Lake Western in 1934. The distance between Denver and Salt Lake City was shortened by 175 miles and put Arvada on a Trans-Continental mainline. By April 24, 1983, the last privately operated long distance passenger train, joined the government subsidized Amtrak agency.



Denver Coal Company Mine

February 5, 1891, Denver Coal Company mine began sinking its shaft . By January 1892 the shaft was down 500 feet. First level at 250 feet runs 72 feet to eight foot coal vein and 100 feet more to a 13 foot nine inch coal vein. Second level ran at 332 foot depth, third level at 417 foot depth and fourth level at 500 foot depth. Erected buildings included shaft house, bunk house, and boarding house. Output: 50 tons of coal daily.
November 1893 mine’s capacity is 200 tons daily, but only 50 tons daily produced due to the work market for coal due to high production of northern Colorado’s coal field.
April 1894, coal mine fire had been checked and 40 men are producing 100 tons of coal daily.


Denver Federal Center

The Denver Federal Center was originally part of a large ranch known as “Down Dale” owned by Major Jacob Downing (1830- 1907). The Thomas S. Hyden Realty Company purchased the ranch in 1913. Lakewood’s quiet rural setting continued to exist until World War II. A few farmsteads and homes dotted the otherwise undeveloped landscape, and Sixth Avenue was a two lane gravel country road. The Hyden Ranch was selected as the site of the Denver Ordnance Plant and in January 1941 the federal government purchased the 2,100-acre parcel. At the end of the war the facility was declared as surplus and urned over to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

The growing need for additional federal office space eventually led government officials to convert the ordnance plant to offices. The first agency to move in was the Veteran’s Administration in February 1946 followed by the Bureau of Reclamation. Today, 27 agencies with over 8,000 employees have office or storage facilities on the Federal Center grounds. Although many changes have occurred over the years, the Denver Federal Center retains many reminders of its rural and manufacturing past.

Prepared by Christine Pfap, Historian, and Roy Winigate, Historian, with the Bureau of Reclamation. August, 1991.


Denver Federal Center – Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA)/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Building #710

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers designed and built this 36,000 sq. foot, two-level square underground facility in 1969. Its lower level is completely below ground, and its upper level is partially below ground, with three feet of earth fill covering its roof. All that can be seen of the structure from its exterior is its concrete entrance and a few pipes and antennas which rise from a large grassed mound to the west of the entrance. Upon entering the building’s lobby immediately to the north, is a set of doors which leads to a tunnel connecting Building #710 with #710-A. West of these doors, stairs lead down to a large steel vault door. The interior of the upper level of the building had the appearance of an office building without windows, with a large operations room at the center. The lower level houses dormitories, medical facility rooms, mechanical systems, storage, and a kitchen. Building 710 was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 2, 2000 (5JF.1048.14).


Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Building #1-B/Denver Federal Center Building #56

Designed by the architect firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, and built by Broderick & Gorden in 1941. This irregular shaped 224,776 sq. foot building during World War II manufactured .30 caliber ammunition and heavy artillery fuze. Current use is government offices, and labs. The structure has one- and two-story elements have a flat concrete roof treated with built up tar and gravel with two-foot overhangs. Most of the building’s exterior is clad with brick. The west elevation of the building was predominately a two-story facade. On the east elevation, the exterior of the first story was dominated by a loading deck and loading bays which serviced railroad tracks. The interior of the structure was originally a large open expanse which served the manufacturing process. A mezzanine level above the main floor looked down on the manufacturing floor. The first major interior to the building 56 began in the mid-to-late 1940s to accommodate the Bureau of Reclamation’s Engineering Center. Part of the central clerestory was extended to a hight of 50 feet to accommodate a large 5,000,000 pound testing machine which could exert pressures on an object, or test tensile strength of objects. This machine, which extends 50 feet above and 16 feet below the floor of the building, has been in continuous use since 1946. In 1967, a small brick addition was constructed on the south elevation and in 1981, the windows on the central clerestory were replaced with insulated panels. The north elevations windows were covered in 1984 and south and west elevations in 1995.



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Bldg. #12-B/Denver Federal Center Bldg. No. 21

This 18,765 sq. foot one-story brick building was built in 1941 as a storage building and later was used for Kaiser Industries Administration offices at the main area of the Denver Ordnance Plant during World War II. Original windows consisted of mostly continuous rows of steel – sash, awning type windows set about seven feet high on the north, south, and west elevations. Original plans show that the east elevation had a small concrete and brick loading deck with a single loading bay. The original building had a wood frame penthouse centered on the roof. In 1963, the majority of the windows on the north, south and west elevations were removed and replaced with insulated panels and new openings with aluminum sash windows were created beneath these windows. In that year, the existing wood roof penthouse was removed and replaced with a larger one of steel construction. In 1979, the one-story tee addition was added to the south elevation, adding to the buildings area by 30 percent. Major interior alterations were also included to the original building as part of this project. The building is presently used as government offices and labs.


Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Bldg. #2-B/ Denver Federal Center #25

This 245,730 sq. foot building was built in 1941 for the manufacture of .30 caliber ammunition and heavy artillery fuze and boosters. This Building is irregular in plan and massing, having one and two – story elements with most of the exterior clad in brick. The west elevation of the building had a predominately two-story facade, with two large clerestory, or monitor sections. On the east elevation, the exterior of the first story was dominated by a loading deck and loading bays which serviced railroad tracks. The interior of the structure was originally a large open expanse which served the manufacturing process. A mezzanine level above the main floor looked down on the main floor. The building experienced major interior renovations during the late 1940s when the USGS housed some of its offices in the building. In 1970, exterior renovations began to replace the original brick surface with a new brick facing. In 1976, the building was severely damaged by fire. Following the fire, major interior renovations were necessary and exterior renovation continued to remove original fabric as well as adding additional new windows, and brick screening of new mechanical systems.


Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #1-A/Denver Federal Center Building #53

Designed by the architectural firm Smith, Hinchman, & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, this 226,175 sq. ft. steel frame building with brick and concrete block walls was built for the U.S. Army by Broderick & Gordon in 1941. During World War II the structure housed the manufacture of .30 caliber ammunition and heavy artillery fuze. This was one of the five main manufacturing buildings associated with the Denver Ordnance Plant. Originally the building had the appearance of an assemblage of rectangles with brick walls which contained large expanses of steel sash windows. The west elevation of the building was a predominately two-story facade, with two large clerestory, or monitor sections, and a series of ventilator pipes piercing an otherwise unobstructed roof. On the east elevation the exterior of the first story was dominated by a loading dock and bays which were serviced by railroad tracks. The core of the interior of the structure was originally a large open expanse which served the manufacturing process. A mezzanine level above the main floor looked down on the main floor. The first major interior renovations to the building began during the mid-to-late 1940s to accommodate the Bureau of Reclamation’s Engineering Center. During this time, space was partitioned to create offices.


Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #1-C/ Denver Federal Center Building #41

Designed by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, this 376,335 sq. foot building was built by Broderick & Gordon in 1941 for the U.S. Army’s Dept. of Ordnance. This building differs from the other historic main manufacturing buildings on the Denver Federal Center in that its structural system is of wood frame construction instead of steel. It has a concrete foundation with concrete interior piers and brick and concrete block walls. Its original purpose was for the manufacture of .30 caliber cartridge cases, experimental steel cartridge cases and heavy artillery fuze. The building originally had a floor area of 405,002 sq. feet, and its central are had a high ceiling with a mezzanine level. Other sections of the building was a combination of one- and two-story elements. Originally the building had the appearance of an assemblage of rectangles with brick walls which contained large expanses of steel sash windows. The west elevation of the building consisted of a predominately two-story facade, with two large clerestory, or monitor sections. On the east elevation, the exterior of the first story was dominated by a loading dock and loading bays which were serviced by railroad tracks. The building was almost completely destroyed by fire in 1947, and a large percentage of the exterior, and nearly the entire interior was greatly modified during rebuilding. In 1964, most of the remaining steel sash windows were replaced with aluminum sash windows and many windows and door openings were bricked in. Also, that same year a new front entrance was constructed. Another fire damaged the building in the 1970’s, after which further interior rebuilding was necessary. The building’s present use is government offices and storage.



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #10/ Denver Federal Center Building #50

Designed by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, this 132,830 sq. foot one-story building was built by Broderick & Gordon in 1942 for the U.S. Army Dept. Of Ordnance. The building’s original use was to house the Denver Ordnance Plant Tool & Gage Shop and the General Foods Corporation C-Ration production. The Original structure was a one-story building with a concrete foundation, concrete interior piers, and a structural system of reinforced concrete members. The exterior finish of the building was brick, and windows were steel-sash awnings set in concrete lintels and sills. The roof was concrete with a two-foot overhanging eaves with a roof treatment of tar and gravel. Prior to the completion of the building a small wood frame addition was added to the south elevation. The first major change to the building was made in 1955, when the top row of the building’s window panes were removed and filled with cement-asbestos board. In addition, bricks below the original windows were removed, and new metal-sash windows were installed on all elevations. The south and east elevation addition to the building was finished in 1978, nearly doubling the size of the original building. It currently houses offices of the General Services Administration (GSA).



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #11/ Denver Federal Center Bldg. #46

Designed by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, this 21,655 sq. foot one-story building was built by Broderich & Gordon in 1941 for the U.S. Army Dept. of Ordnance. This building served as the lead shop the Main Manufacturing section of the Denver Ordnance Plant during W.W. II. The structure was built with a reinforced concrete foundation and piers and reinforced concrete frame, floors, and roof. Original windows consisted of eight-foot high continuous rows of steel-sash, awning type windows set about six-feet from the ground on the north and west elevations, and a four-foot high continuous set of steel-sash awning windows set about eight feet from the ground on the east elevation, with four leading bay doors spaced evenly beneath them. The south entrance served as the main entrance, with a single set of double steel frame doors with a double lighted transom. Major alterations were performed in 1967, when new brick pilasters and aluminum frame doors and windows were also replaced with insulated panels in this year. Several other windows and doors were filled in with brick at this time, and brick screening walls for mechanical systems were installed in 1967. In 1979, handicapped provisions were added to both the interior and exterior of the structure. The buildings present use is government offices and photo lab.



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #12-A/Denver Federal Center Building #55

Designed by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman, & Gryles of Detroit Michigan, and built by Broderick & Gordon in 1941, this 13,200 sq. foot, one-story brick walled structure was originally used for storage. The north and west elevations have window openings with concrete cells which start at about 7 feet high, but which have all been filled in with brick. The majority of the south elevation windows also have been filled in with brick. The east elevation’s loading dock had been inclosed with brick.



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #2-A/Denver Federal Center Building #20

This 249,000 sq. ft., brick building built in 1941, is irregular in plan and massing, having one- and two-story elements. Its original use was for the manufacture of .30 caliber cartridge cases and heavy artillery shells. The west elevation of the building consisted of a predominately two-story facade with two large clerestory, or monitor sections. On the east elevation, the exterior of the first story was dominated by a loading dock and loading bays which serviced the railroad tracks. The interior core of the building was originally a large open expanse for manufacturing with a mezzanine level overlooking the main floor. In 1946, there was a major renovation for the offices of the Veterans Administration. Also, records of the veterans residing in the mountain division were housed here. In 1965, the building underwent major remodeling which included the removal of windows on the north and east elevations. Most of these window openings were covered with insulated panels, but many were also filled in with masonry blocks and stucco. At this time, other extant windows were replaced with modern aluminum sash windows. In 1978, a 106′ x 50′, brick, one-story addition was built on the south elevation for use by the U.S. Geologic Survey. Also, several brick screening walls were erected at this time, enclosing open areas between the irregular sections of the building’s west elevation.



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #5/ Denver Federal Center Bldg. #40

Designed by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman & Griles of Detroit, Michigan, this 51,110 sq. foot building was built by Broderick & Gordon in 1941. This building served as the administrative offices and for the US Army Dept. of Ordnance health center for the Denver Ordnance Plant during World War II. This building is a basic “T” plan, two-story structure with brick exterior walls. The roof is concrete with a two-foot overhanging eaves. The main entrance is located at the top of the “T” on the southern elevation, to the left of that elevation’s center. Relatively few renovations have been made to this building. In 1978, handicapped provisions were made to the entrance and lavatories.



Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #68/Denver Federal Center Building #5 (Gate #2)

This one-story, 2,250 sq. ft., brick building was constructed in 1941. This structure was a Gate House for the Denver Ordnance Plant. Originally, the building was a basic “L” plan and except for the plywood covering the east entrance, the exterior of the older, southern section has not been altered since World War II. Originally, the north elevation of the section had a storage area covered by an open frame roof. In 1969, this roofed area was replaced with the current brick section. The building’s present use is for governmental offices and labs.


Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #8/ Denver Federal Center Building #45

Designed by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, this 74,710 sq. foot building was built by Broderick & Gordon in 1941 for the U.S. Army’s Dept. of Ordnance. This building is a basic “L” plan with small irregularities. It is a one-story structure with brick exterior walls. The main entrance is at the west end of a small southward extension of the “L”. Its original use was a ballistics proofing range. Originally designed to have nine firing ranges at its north end, the building was added to in 1942, to increase the number of ranges to 13. The longest of these firing ranges was in an underground tunnel which crossed under an existing road, terminating at the underground targets approximately 90 yards to the north of the northern edges of the building, giving the range a total length of 175 yards. Behind each of the targets was a large earth mound to stop stray bullets. The target ranges were removes during the 1950s, when the building was converted for use as office space, and in 1967, including the addition of the vertical metal louvers, and the filling of several window openings with bricks. At this time nearly the entire interior of the building was renovated.



Denver Federal Center – Office of Civil Defense (OCD) Emergency Operations Center

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built this underground, single-level, 2,500 sq. foot structure in 1960. This building is a metal quonset constructed of deep corrugated metal with ribs 10 to 12 inches deep. It is partially below ground, with several feet of earth fill covering the top of this structure. The exterior appears as a large rectangular earth mound having four vent stacks at the top. The north elevation of the structure has a small front-gabled wood frame section about 10 feet long which covers the north elevation entrance to the bunker. The structure is abandoned and its interior bare. There is a small wood frame enclosure on the west side of the interior. This was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 16, 1999 (5JF.1048.13).


Denver Federal Center – Ordnance Plant Guard Tower

Designed by Smith Hinchman &Inc., Architects and Engineers of Detroit, Michigan, and built in 1941. The guard tower is 10 feet by 10 feet at the base. The upper portion projects two feet over the base on the right hand side. The single room at the top of the tower has bullet proof windows and metal sheeting, also bullet proof, below the windows. Tear-drop shaped openings are found on each view of the metal sheeting. The openings were to allow the guard to fire from the tower. A spot light still occupies the roof. Siding was added to the tower base in the 1950s.




Denver Leadville Stage Line

The stage forded Elk Creek at this location in the 1870s and 1880s and was named for the route the line travelled.



Denver Mountain Parks

A parks system owned by the City and County of Denver, consisting of over 8,600 acres in 24 named and developed parks and about 5,000 acres in 24 undeveloped properties, nearly all in Jefferson County. The famed and unique parks system includes a variety of recreational facilities, scenery, elevations, fishing, 1000 acres of buffalo and elk pasture, a golf course, and the spectacular Red Rocks Park. It also includes 24 wilderness areas and 20 mountain peaks.
John Brisben Walker and Mayor Robert Speer conceived the system, which opened in 1913 supported by a one-half mill levy. George Cranmer as Manager of Parks strongly supported the system in the 1930s and 1940s. Named after the City of Denver.


Denver Municipal Aqueduct

This aqueduct was built by the Denver Water Board to carry water from the Platte River to Marston Lake.


Denver Ordnance Plant/Remington Arms Company

Preparations for the United States’ entry into World War II brought sudden changes to the area. In December, 940 the Federal Government announced its intention to build a munitions manufacturing and testing plant in Denver. The Hyden Ranch property was selected as the site for the Denver Ordnance Plant and in January, 1941, the government concluded the purchase of a 2,100-acre parcel. Part of this site became the Federal Center at the close of the war.

Plans for the ordnance plant proceeded quickly. Within the same month that the land purchase was completed, the Federal Government contracted with the Remington Arms Company to operate the facility. A month later a ground breaking ceremony took place with great fanfare. Before long, heavy equipment had graded the fields and foundations were being laid for a large complex of manufacturing structures. Over 6,000 people were employed in the enormous constructions project. By October 1941, the first phase of the plant was completed at a cost of $28 million dollars.

Between 1941 and 1943, 92 buildings were constructed at the ordnance plant. By the end of the war, the facility consisted of nearly 200 structures, many of which are still in use today as federal government offices and labs.

At first, the Denver Ordnance Plant manufactured only caliber .30 ammunition, including ball, armor piercing, tracer and incendiary rounds. It was the only facility in the country to produce caliber .30 ammunition exclusively. The plant employed 10,000 people and was capable of making 4 million rounds a day.

Production peaked in the summer of 1943. The number of employees had risen to 19,500 and they were turning out an astounding 6.25 million rounds daily. The plant was in operation 24 hours a day and included dining facilities, and a fire and police station, among other services. A railroad traversed the plant delivering materials needed to manufacture the ammunition and for transporting it to distribution points throughout the country.

In May 1944, Kaiser Industries was awarded a contract to manufacture heavy artillery shells ad the Ordnance Plant. Following the installation of new equipment, production of 8 inch and 155 millimeter shells began. Over subsequent months additional contracts were awarded to Kaiser, Remington Arms and General Foods. The latter company operated a C-ration assembly and package facility.

The end of hostilities in the summer of 1945 brought an immediate end to production at the Ordnance Plant. By October, only 600 people were still working at the site. The facility was declared surplus property and turned over to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

Prepared by Christine Pfap, Historian, and Roy Winigate, Historian, with the Bureau of Reclamation. August, 1991


Denver Shale Brick Co.

Arvada’s first industry was incorporated in 1907 as the Denver Shale Brick Company. J. J. Cooke, A. J. Fowler and W. H. Coon were the officers of the new industry. Clay was extracted from the ground May to October and the yard was closed for the winter. The stable area remained open, and bricks continued to be sold to contractors year-round. Several buildings in Denver, including the early library at Civic Center and buildings in Arvada used the brick until the quality of clay became unsatisfactory. The Arvada Shale Brick Company went out of business in 1924.



Denver View Elementary School

District 49 was formed from the northern part of District No. 6. Rufus Belgin, youngest son of pioneer Solomon Belgin, gave the three-acre site for the school. When the school was no longer needed in 1904, it was deeded back to Rufus Belgin. Half of the school still stands on the Belgin property and the other half was given to Camp Id-Ra-Ha-Je and moved to Bailey, Colo.




Denver, Auraria & Colorado Wagon Road

from Cultural Contexts report, 2004

Denver, Auraria & Colorado Wagon Road/Mount Vernon Road (1859)
This toll road was incorporated by Joseph Casto, Horner Fellos, Christian Dorsey and Solomon Shrop to travel from Denver-Auraria to Saratoga West (Hot Sulphur Springs) on the Blue Fork of the Colorado River. It climbed Mount Vernon Canyon and branched southwest through Bergen Park and Bradford Junction, where it connected at Bradford Junction (Conifer) to continue on into Park County. In 1860, it was the most frequently used route in the county, with up to fifty wagons passing daily up the canyon.


Denver, Auraria & South Park Wagon Road

from the Cultural Contexts report, 2004

Denver, Auraria & South Park Wagon Road (1859)
This toll road was incorporated by J. H. Cochran, Samuel Brown, and Joseph Brown. It originated at Denver-Auraria and ran south to Piedmont (later the Bradford townsite) in the north end of Ken Caryl Valley. It was intended to reach South Park. Apparently the incorporators built the road southwest from Denver, but the west leg from Bradford into the mountains was constructed by Major Robert Bradford as the Denver, Bradford & Blue River Road.


Denver, Bradford & Blue River Road

from the Cultural Contexts report, 2004:

Denver, Bradford & Blue River Road (1861)
Major Robert Bradford developed this toll road to access Park County and points west. He received a charter from Colorado Territory on October 11, 1861 for the road, which went from Denver via Bradford on to Hamilton to reach Breckenridge. Bradford’s partners were George D. Bayaud, Luther A. Cole, Daniel McCleery, J. W. McIntyre, A. McPhadden, and D. C. Vance. The road scaled “terrible” Bradford Hill, dropped into South Turkey Creek Canyon near Twin Forks, where it continued west and joined the road from Bergen Park at Bradford Junction (Conifer) to continue on into South Park. Toll fees were $1 per wagon and team, each additional span 25 cents, horsemen 10 cents, livestock 5 cents, sheep 1 cent. No toll was charged for people traveling to church services or a funeral.


Denver, Leadville & Gunnison Railroad

This line was named in 1889 after having been called the South Park Division of the Union Pacific since 1881. It was sold to the Colorado & Southern Railroad in 1898.


Denver, South Park & Pacific Railroad

Constructed in 1878 and became the South Park Division of the Union Pacific Railroad in 1881. It was reorganized in 1889 and named Denver, Leadville & Gunnison Railroad, sold to the Colorado & Southern Railroad in 1898 and continued to operate until the line was discontinued in April 1937. From a 1922 timetable, some of the stops listed in Jefferson County were Waterton, South Platte, Buffalo, Pine Grove, Crystal Lake, and Crossons.


Denver, South Park & Pacific Railroad – Denver to Morrison Line

As early as 1868 a route had been made which covered part of the line’s subsequent construction. The survey envisioned a railroad extending from Denver to Santa Fe, New Mexico, through South Park along the Arkansas River for a short stretch and then to the mining districts in the San Juans in southwestern Colorado, and from that corner of the State to the Pacific Ocean. In April 1874 actual laying of the rails began and by late June the line was completed to Morrison and two locomotives began regular service. The principle freight hauled out of Morrison consisted of stone, lumber and a little coal. By 1875 there were two regular passenger trains each way between Denver and Morrison. Among the founders of this enterprise where Governor John Evans, who was the railroad’s first president; Joseph Bates, Jerome Chaffee, W.S. Cheesman, Frederick A. Clark, Henry Crow, Leonard H. Eicholtz, S.H. Elbert, Bela M. Hughs, George W. Kassler, Charles B. Kountze, David H. Moffat, and F.Z. Saloman.


Denver, South Park & Pacific Railroad – Garfield Branch

In 1878, the Denver, South Park & Pacific Railroad built the narrow gauge Garfield Branch to the Garfield Quarry and Satanic Mine site. Bandimere Speedway and Interstate C-470 have destroyed portions of the road bed’s right-of-way.


Denver, Turkey Creek & South Park Wagon Road

from the Cultural Contexts report, 2004:

Denver, Turkey Creek & South Park Wagon Road (1866)
This toll road was built through lower Turkey Creek Canyon to compete with the Denver, Bradford & Blue River Wagon Road. It joined the Bradford road in South Turkey Creek Canyon near Twin Forks to continue through Bradford Junction (Conifer) and on to South Park and points west. It became the primary route from Denver to South Park in 1867.


Denver, Utah & Pacific Railroad Grade

Built in 1881-1882, but never used, by David H. Moffat, this 8200-foot-long railroad grade consisting of a large earthen berm varying in height and width from a couple hundred feet high on the southeastern portions, where some sections are not extant, to approximately 10′ to 15′ high and 20′ wide in some areas of the northwestern corner of the plant site. The extant portions of the railroad berm are located on the gently rolling plains on the northwestern side of the plant. The berm transects several tributaries of the headwaters of intermittent Rock Creek. In many areas, this has created small ponds, which may have functioned as stock ponds. There are stands on pinon pine, rare to the plant site located along the berm.


Despain Ditch

Now abandoned, this ditch diverted water from Farmer’s Highline Canal and ran northeast into Westminster in Adams County. Built by the first resident of Westminster, Pleasant Despain, to supply water to settlers in the area. Records of the State Engineer show water was adjudicated to “Despain Dry Creek Feeder” in October 9, 1895, appropriation date February 22, 1897. This ditch is also shown on 1915 “Map of Denver and Surroundings,” by R.W. Gelder, C.E. of Greeley.


Devil’s Garden Gulch

This tributary (right hand) of Bear Creek (mouth), S32, T4S, R70W, is about 1.5 miles long and is .5 mile west of Idledale. Denver Mountain Parks Map, 1924 (1939). Devil’s Garden Gulch takes its name from the lower .5 mile of the gulch made impassable by rock formations.


Devil’s Gulch

A tributary of Bear Creek which joins the latter just above Idledale. Name source unknown.



Dike Ditch

McIntyre Gulch starts up in the Green Mountain Estate area and flows down towards the Federal Center, across towards Carr Street where it converges with Lakewood Gulch.


Dillon Park

A Denver mountain park of 160 acres acquired in 1922. It has fireplaces, picnic areas, and hiking trails, and is one mile south of Evergreen. Name source unknown.


Dinosaur Trail

“Dinosaur Trail, at foot of mountain from which fossil monsters were taken for eastern museum, connects Morrison and Golden, eight miles. Park of the Red Rocks, one-half mile northwest of Morrison. Three miles northwest is the entrance to Mount Vernon Canyon; state road leads to Genesee Park. Two and one-half miles south of Morrison is the entrance to Turkey Creek Canyon, the main road to Shaffer’s Crossing and Bailey’s on the South Platte.”


Disabled American Veterans Park

By 1946, the Disabled American Veterans purchased the property from the Vasa Building Club. Members of the purchasing committee were: Clyde Beugley, Robert Frazell, Robert Wilson, Wally Whiting, Carl Hood, and Robert Montgomery. The DAV Chapter #22 was named for George G. Klumker, age 19, first known casualty from Arvada killed in World War II For years the Chapter received their mail in Arvada. When Wheat Ridge was incorporated the property was under the jurisdiction of Wheat Ridge, which changed the mailing address to Wheat Ridge, 80033.


Dix Saddle

Named for Thomas Dix, an early area homesteader.



Dog Hollow

Dog Hollow was the popular name for the lower, and less reputable, portion of downtown Golden, in the area of Ford Street just south of Clear Creek. The Golden Eagle (future Golden Globe) newspaper was established here by John Sarell, and is the object of this name’s sole written historical account. This area, while lively into the 1880s, died out and became a ghetto, gradually dismantled until the obliteration of the last of its buildings in 1936 to make way for the Central School.



Dome Rock

It was a stop on the Colorado & Southern Railroad and named for the rock formation at its peak.


Dome Rock Post Office

The first postmaster recorded in July 1880 was Frank B. Ross,who served until 1880. On March 1, 1886, a Ulysses S.Grant was registered. This entry had to have been made by a namesake or prankster since the former United States president and Union Army general died the year previously, July 23, 1885. The office was discontinued May 11,1886.


Dome Rock Railroad Station

This station served as a combination depot and living quarters while in service. The railroad line was discontinued in 1938.


Doublehead Mountain

Obviously named for the physical appearance of its twin rocky peaks. Located about 1 1/4 miles northwest of Windy Point on US Hwy. 285. Presently the site for communication towers.





Douglas Park

In 1937, this was one of the first Evergreen subdivisions planned for year-round homes. Dr. Josepha Douglas, wife of Canon Douglas, developed of 34 one-acre home sites just above Main Street. Named after the Douglas family.



Down Dale

The Denver Federal Center was originally part of a large ranch known as “Down Dale” owned by the prominent Colorado pioneer Major Jacob Downing (1830- 1907). Downing was a noted lawyer and judge who achieved fame as a soldier during the Civil War and also at the infamous Sand Creek Massacre. In the late 1860s, Downing acquired a 2,000-acre parcel of land east of Green Mountain and proceeded to irrigate and fence the property. He planted fruit trees and sugar beets, and introduced the first alfalfa, quail and Hereford herd to Colorado. He also built a race track on his ranch where he raced his prized thoroughbred Arabian horses. Nothing remans of his ranch.

The irrigation ditch which runs through the Federal Center dates to the Downing years. In 1974, the Agricultural Ditch Company is still in existence and maintains the ditch on a regular basis.

The masonry flume which carries the irrigation ditch over McIntyre Gulch in the southeast quadrant of the Federal Center probably dates to the mid 1870s and is the oldest known structure on the Center. The aqueduct has been repaired a number of times as evident by the variety of building materials.
Jacob Downing died December 1, 1907 and his famous ranch lands were purchased from his estate in February, 1913, by Thomas S. Hyden Realty Company, of which William F. Hyden was then president. Over the years, the Company added to the Down Dale property until it owned a prospering 6,300 acre cattle ranch. The Hyden lands stretched from Garrison to Rooney Road, and from West Sixth Avenue south to Alameda Parkway. It appears that the small pond just west of Kipling know as Downing Reservoir was constructed by Hyden. Photographs from the late 1930s show the pond with an array of farm buildings located to the south of it.

Prepared by Christine Pfap, Historian, and Roy Winigate, Historian, with the Bureau of Reclamation. August, 1991


Downing Reservoir

Claimant in 1936 was W.H. Hayden, ASD successor in interest to the Thomas S. Hayden Realty Company. Filled from Clear Creek via agricultural ditch. Construction prior to 1892.


Drake Junior High School

Drake Junior High School was built in 1959 and was named for Obediah Drake, superintendent of Arvada School District No. 2 from 1902-1919







Dry Creek Valley School

Dry Creek Valley School in District No. 25 existed in 1912 and was named because it was near Dry Creek.


Dry Gulch

Dry Gulch begins below 13th Avenue and Harlan Street to connect with Lakewood Gulch.


Duggan House

Built in 1919, this is a one-story, wood frame, 800 sq. ft., ranch style house.



Dunlap House

Built in 1933, this 1 1/2 story frame, 585-square-foot bungalow has a side gable roof, dormers with shingle siding, exposed gable roof, and multi-paned windows.


Dunstan Junior High School

Built in 1968. Named for Irene Z Dunstan. Mrs. Dunstan was a school principal and Assistant Superintendent of R-1 Schools.


Duplex Cabin

Built circa 1923-24. Designated a county landmark 9/8/2003.


Durham House

Built in ca. 1880. Mr. Fillmore Durham was the railroad station master, and his wife was the telegraph operator. He was killed on Bear Creek Avenue by a car in 1936 at age 84. The building is now used as a rental.


Dutch Creek

This creek starts in Section 28 and flows into Arapahoe County and the Platte River.


Dutch Creek Elementary School

Located ten blocks east of Wadsworth on Coal Mine Avenue and six blocks south on Webster Street, this school is part of the Jefferson County R1 School District. It was built in 1973 for grades K-6 with a capacity of 730. It was named for a creek that borders the school property.