This is an early beta version that’s still a work in progress. We hope to develop and refine the contents going forward. In the meantime, we’re making it fully available to the public as-is. Started by the Jefferson County Historical Commission in the 1990s, it was transferred to the Golden History Museum-City of Golden in 2020.

Denver Federal Center – Denver Ordnance Plant Building #1-C/ Denver Federal Center Building #41


AddressBounded by Federal Ave. to the north, Federal Ave. to the south, Fourth St. to the east, and Fith St. to the west, within the Denver Federal Center, Lakewood, 80225
QuadFort Logan, 1965 (1994)
SectionS9, T4S, R69W
ElevationNULL
SourceHistoric Building Inventory #5FJ1048.6, 1996, CHS
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Initialdate1998-12-20 00:00:00-07
PersonKER
Latestdate2012-11-28 00:00:00-07
Person2REL
HistoryDesigned by the architectural firm of Smith, Hinchman & Grylis of Detroit, Michigan, this 376,335 sq. foot building was built by Broderick & Gordon in 1941 for the U.S. Army's Dept. of Ordnance. This building differs from the other historic main manufacturing buildings on the Denver Federal Center in that its structural system is of wood frame construction instead of steel. It has a concrete foundation with concrete interior piers and brick and concrete block walls. Its original purpose was for the manufacture of .30 caliber cartridge cases, experimental steel cartridge cases and heavy artillery fuze. The building originally had a floor area of 405,002 sq. feet, and its central are had a high ceiling with a mezzanine level. Other sections of the building was a combination of one- and two-story elements. Originally the building had the appearance of an assemblage of rectangles with brick walls which contained large expanses of steel sash windows. The west elevation of the building consisted of a predominately two-story facade, with two large clerestory, or monitor sections. On the east elevation, the exterior of the first story was dominated by a loading dock and loading bays which were serviced by railroad tracks. The building was almost completely destroyed by fire in 1947, and a large percentage of the exterior, and nearly the entire interior was greatly modified during rebuilding. In 1964, most of the remaining steel sash windows were replaced with aluminum sash windows and many windows and door openings were bricked in. Also, that same year a new front entrance was constructed. Another fire damaged the building in the 1970's, after which further interior rebuilding was necessary. The building's present use is government offices and storage.
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